Note for my thesis groupmates –

After hours of testing I finally got MyODBC to work…

*Phew* I think I\’m just an idiot for not discovering this tool earlier. This article on how ODBC access MySQL in .NET made the concept clearer to me. I thought using MySQL in Visual Studio 2005 would require hand-coding the database connection. It\’s easier than I thought because there\’s a query builder in it, yet it\’s still peculiar to me. I have to check the MyODBC manual on how to use it effectively since stored procedures and views were added to MySQL 5 already. I guess this is a good sign as we can concentrate more on the the application logic and spend less time building complex database query.

Here\’s a small screenshot of my workspace doing the n00bish query in VS.NET 2005 from MySQL 5 database (a dummy wordpress database dump)

\"MyODBC

Here\’s the output of my simple query…

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Looks simple, right?

So what\’s the big deal with MyODBC? Hint: it\’s all about $$$. If we can use MySQL 5 instead of MS SQL Server 2005 then we can save a lot of money not only in the development but also in the deployment of the web application. Initially we wanted to use the L.A.M.P. (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) to power our web application — all open-source. Cool. However it\’s very idealistic since we cannot possibly code the entire application with our current knowledge and skill level. Not Cool. The server that we are going to deploy is going to be a Windows Server 2003 (we have no choice!) so in line with Windows Server 2003, we might as well code in Visual Studio. In addition, if we are going to race with time then Visual Studio is the right tool for rapid development — not necessarily the best but it serves its purpose.

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